Implants to Replace Single Teeth

1.) Bone Grafting Prior to Implant Placement to Reduce the Recession and Improve the Cosmetics

Pre-op picture showing severe recession of the gum. This has the appearance of a "fang."

Pre-op picture showing severe recession of the gum. This has the appearance of a "fang."

Post-op picture following tooth removal and bone grafting of the area at the time of the removal.

Post-op picture following tooth removal and bone grafting of the area at the time of the removal.

The final replacement tooth held by an implant. Note the excellent and dramatic improvement from the pre-op appearance above.

The final replacement tooth held by an implant. Note the excellent and dramatic improvement from the pre-op appearance above.

2.) Replacement of a Failing Molar Tooth With a Single Implant

Prior to the development of dental implants, a failed molar tooth was replaced with a “permanent bridge” or a removable denture. Now with dental implants, a molar or any other tooth can be replaced with a dental implant, without grinding down the adjacent teeth.

Pre-op X-ray Failed Molar Tooth

Pre-op X-ray Failed Molar Tooth

Tooth has failed due to a root canal problem. Notice the severe recession from the infection

Tooth has failed due to a root canal problem.

Notice the severe recession from the infection

Final Implant Retained Crown

 Notice how there is much less recession of the final crown as the area was bone grafted at the time of tooth removal.

This enhanced the aesthetics of the final crown restoration.

Implants are used to replace single missing teeth as shown above very successfully. The missing teeth can be in the front or the back of the mouth. Utilizing implants prevents the need to grind down adjacent teeth to make “permanent bridgework”. The adjacent teeth are not used or harmed by the single implant restoration.

3.) Single Implant to Replace a Failed or Missing Front Tooth

Pre-op x-ray of tooth which has fractured and needs removal.

Pre-op x-ray of tooth which has fractured and needs removal.

Post-op x-ray showing final crown supported by the implant

Post-op x-ray showing final crown supported by the implant

The final clinical appearance of the implant supported crown. Can you tell which is the natural tooth and which is the implant crown?

The final clinical appearance of the implant supported crown. Can you tell which is the natural tooth and which is the implant crown?

 When the tooth was removed, bone graft material was placed into the extraction site to preserve the jaw. This allowed the final crown to achieve maximum aesthetics.